How do Indiana Candidates for the 2022 Election Feel about Ranked Choice Voting (RCV)?

(Download PDF Report)

Better Ballot Indiana conducted a survey of Indiana candidates for the 2022 election. Our survey shows broad support among over 70% of respondents with just 7% opposed. Supporters represent every major political party. Over 50% are so supportive, they are ready to get the ball rolling by sponsoring RCV legislation!

RCV Candidate Support

We asked over 200 candidates for the upcoming election one simple question:

To what extent would you support legislation to give voters a Ranked Choice Voting option? Those who support legislation would vote for it, but some would additionally work to draft a bill and build a coalition by sponsoring RCV legislation.

If you do not see a response from candidates in your district, we have not been able to reach them for a response. We would love your help! Call or email to tell them about Better Ballot Indiana and Ranked Choice Voting so we can add your voice and theirs to the call for RCV.

If you do not know your voting districts, you can look them up: http://iga.in.gov/legislative/find-legislators/

 

Ranked Choice Voting Legislator Line-Up 2022

In Indiana, the general election takes place on November 8, 2022. Better Ballot Indiana surveyed candidates to determine their level of support for Ranked Choice Voting (RCV).

Many candidates participated, though we largely targeted state officials for a reason. In Indiana, it is currently illegal for any level of government to implement RCV for public elections. Voters in Indiana who want ranked choice options at the city, county, or state level are currently denied that option. Voters do not have access, despite support seemingly among all major parties. The Libertarian, Green, and Forward parties use RCV regularly for their internal elections and are strong supporters. The Indiana GOP used RCV in its own party’s elections in 2020, and an Indiana DNC legislator recently sponsored legislation to implement RCV.

This survey helps voters see existing bipartisan interest among legislators and will bring together a legislative coalition to give Indiana voters the Ranked Choice Voting we want.

Survey Responses by Office

What is Ranked Choice Voting?

Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) is an established, widely used voting method, whereby voters, instead of being limited to just 1 candidate on the ballot, rank candidates in order of preference – 1,2,3, etc. This method is more intuitive for voters, essentially as easy as picking 1, and provides more meaningful voter intent to our representatives. In an RCV election, every elected candidate has support from a majority of voters in the final count. And RCV elections eliminate forever voter concerns about “voting for the lesser of two evils” and arguments about “spoiler candidates.”

Advocates also represent RCV as a method to:

  1.  reduce the polarization that we are experiencing in Indiana (and nationwide),
  2.  reduce the risk of political violence,
  3.  increase voter turnout and satisfaction,
  4.  attract Independent voters, the the largest block of voters, and
  5.  amplify the voice of voters.

RCV is already being used in elections in 55 locations across the nation – Alaska and Maine both use it statewide for all presidential and congressional elections, and NYC uses it for municipal offices.

RCV is a simple yet powerful solution that gives people an equally strong voice and more choice. By implementing RCV across Indiana, we can give voters more choice and help legislators better hear the voice of their voters.

 

About Better Ballot Indiana

Better Ballot Indiana is a non-partisan Indiana non-profit corporation 501(c)(3) formed to educate and empower Hoosiers to strengthen our democracy in Indiana through RCV. We are a 100% volunteer organization made up of Indiana voters.

Better Ballot Indiana does not endorse, support, or oppose any political candidate. The following information is presented to educate Indiana Voters about candidate positions on issues as they participate in the political process. Ultimately, our goal is to promote RCV across Indiana, as we believe it can give voters more choice and more voice in our elections.

Check your voting status and location at https://indianavoters.in.gov.

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Meet Each Respondent

Candidates are listed alphabetically by political race. Selected commentary included with listings. Counties shown may not be precise and are for geographic reference only.

Candidates Willing to Sponsor or Help Sponsor RCV Legislation (27)

US Representatives (5)

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Jacob Bailey

US Representative
9th District
(Green)

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Matthew Fyfe

US Representative
9th District
(Democrat)

“We need to safeguard against extremism. Ranked Choice Voting is one way to do this and I'm in favor of that.” 

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William Henry

US Representative
2nd District
(Libertarian)

“If elected to any state level legislative position, I would author legislation to change.”

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Andrew Horning

US Representative
8th District
(Libertarian)

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Tonya L. Millis

US Representative
9th District
(Libertarian)

 


US Senators (2)

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Haneefah Khaaliq

US Senator
(Independent)

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James M. Sceniak

US Senator
(Libertarian)

 


State Representatives (14)

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Lisa Beck

State Representative
District 19
(Lake, Democrat)

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Dion Bergeron

State Representative
District 9
(Laporte, Republican)

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Kurtis J. Cummings

State Representative
District 46
(Monroe, Democrat)

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Sue Errington

State Representative
District 34
(Delaware, Democrat)

*Rep. Errington sponsored RCV legislation in 2021

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Chad Harmon

State Representative
District 69
(Bartholomew, Democrat)

“I think RCV is a better method of determining the true will of the people of Indiana.”

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Tammari Ingalls

State Representative
District 50
(Huntington, Democrat)

“I am in full support of Ranked Choice Voting because it allows voters to cast their ballots in a manner that is most reflective of any given district. RCV is the fairest and most honest way of voting.”

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Andy Miller

State Representative
District 93
(Marion, Democrat)

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Morgan Rigg

State Representative
District 52
(DeKalb, Libertarian)

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Mark Spelbring

State Representative
District 42
(Clay, Democrat)

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Ross Thomas

State Representative
District 59
(Bartholomew, Democrat)

“I have followed the use of ranked choice voting in other places such as Maine, NYC, and most recently, Alaska. I’m a strong supporter, as a method to bring more viewpoints and choices, and to better reflect the will of the voters.”

Ken Tucker

State Representative,
District 24
(Boone, Independent)

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Josh Vergielss

State Representative,
District 22
(Elkhart, Libertarian)

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Robin Williams

State Representative
District 30
(Grant, Democrat)

“I consider myself an aggressive centrist politically and I would like to see the voting process more balanced in the future.”

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Greg A. Woods

State Representative
District 41
(Boone, Democrat)

“I would gladly help promote this option. I have watched what this has done in other states and feel this could be our next phase of voting.”

 


State Senators (2)

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Andrea Hunley

State Senator
District 46
(Marion, Democrat)

“I have been studying ranked choice voting and its benefits. I closely followed its use in New York. RCV would be especially valuable in primary elections, especially in our heavily gerrymandered areas where one party has been packed in.”

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Bryan Muñoz

State Senator
District 41
(Bartholomew, Democrat)

 


Secretary of State (2)

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Jeffrey Maurer

Secretary of State
(Libertarian)

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David Wetterer

Secretary of State
(Green)

 


Local Candidates (2)

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Brendan Kearns

Commissioner
1st District
(Vigo, Democrat)

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Cassie Rolon

Warsaw Wayne
Township Board
(Kosciusko, Libertarian)

“I believe Ranked Choice Voting would be best when dealing with elections. It takes away from negative campaigns and the “lesser of 2 evils” talk because you’ll want to be people's 1st and 2nd choice!”

 



Additional Candidates Who Support RCV (11)

State Representatives (6)

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Heidi Beidinger

State Representative
District 5
(St Joseph, Democrat)

“I support ranked choice voting and firmly support the idea that the winner of any election should be elected by a majority of voters.”

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Chris Campbell

State Representative
District 26
(Tippecanoe, Democrat)

“I would love to support ranked choice voting and even author legislation.“

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Jordan A. Davis

State Representative
District 87
(Marion, Republican)

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Mark J. Genda

State Representative
District 41
(Boone, Republican)

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Nan Polk

State Representative
District 54
(Henry, Democrat)

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John P. Schmitz

State Representative
District 97
(Marion, Republican)

“Anything to make fair and competitive elections possible”


State Senators (3)

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Spencer R. Deery

State Senator
District 23
(Fountain, Republican)

I support it in theory but I know it can come in different formats and believe not all setups are equal in merit. I have not had the time to really dive in and study the details of how it could work and which model might be the best for Indiana but I would like to do so in coming months. Once I get to that point, I may be willing to sponsor legislation.”

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David A Sanders

State Senator
District 23
(Fountain, Democrat)

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Evan Russell Shearin

State Senator
District 46
(Marion, Republican)


Local Candidates (2)

Tommy Brown III

County Commissioner
(Washington, Libertarian)

“I fully support rank choice voting.It's time we come into the future.”

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Adam Neumeyer

Washington Township Board
(Allen, Libertarian)

“I completely support alternative voting methods like Instant Runoff/Ranked Choice or Approval Voting. First Past the Post voting, which most elections in the US use, encourages strategic voting where voters have strong incentive to vote not for their actual preferred candidate but for who they think is most likely to defeat their least preferred candidate. RCV or Approval do not perfectly eliminate strategic voting, but they are many times better than FPTP. I believe strategic voting for "the lesser of two evils" is the primary cause of polarization and division in the US today, and if we want a more cooperative country and society, we must move away from FPTP toward one of the alternatives.”

 

Candidates Who Responded but Don’t Yet Have a Policy (11)

State Representatives 

  • Cody Alsman - District 45 (Sullivan, Independent)
  • John Couch - District 92 (Marion, Republican)
  • Teresa Kendall - District 63 (Daviess, Democrat)
    • “I have never had a voter ask about Ranked Choice Voting.”
  • Manuel Maldonado - District 10 (Porter, Republican)
  • Tim O'brien - District 78 (Vanderburgh, Republican)
  • Tonya Pfaff - District 44 (Clay, Democrat)

State Senators

  • Scott Alexander - District 26 (Delaware, Republican)
  • Eric Bassler - District 39 (Daviess, Republican)
  • Jon Ford - District 38 (Vigo, Republican)
  • Tyler Johnson - District 14 (Allen, Republican)
  • Linda Rogers - District 11 (Elkhart, Republican)
    • “I'd like to get more feedback from my constituents before making a policy.”

 

Candidates Who Oppose Ranked Choice Voting (4)

State Representatives 

  • Dale Basham - District 34 (Delaware, Republican)
  • Andrew Mcneil - District 43 (Vigo, Republican)
  • Bruce Borders - District 45 (Daviess, Republican)

State Senators

  • Daniel Dernulc - District 1 (Lake, Republican)



* Send corrections or additions to [email protected]